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London, EC2Y 8DD
United Kingdom

+44 20 3318 5728

London-based creative training, consulting & strategic design company providing onsite & public courses on the Creative Problem Solving Process, team-building, leadership, entrepreneurial mindset, business storytelling, applied improvisation and innovation facilitation. We run ideation sessions, we mentor, we coach, we deliver. In all we do, we're here to make you more agile & more successful in the face of change. 

Change Culture by Doing – a webinar with Innovation Management

Blog

Change Culture by Doing – a webinar with Innovation Management

Kate Hammer

KILN has been busy today. The Innovation Management webinar this afternoon attracted over 240 registrations. With panellists from HP, SCA and UHG it’s no wonder. The recording will be available on IM soon. Meantime, here are some quick replies to a few of the questions folks posed as they registered for the event. An additional 103 questions or comments were shared in real-time, over half of which we were able to respond to. (Yes, it was like juggling plates.)

Question:

What are the driving factors in order to change an employee’s behaviour in a large, complex organisation?

 Our reply:

If you’re an individual in a team, you may be aware of the following factors:

  • Formal incentives – like appraisals, promotions and remuneration increases – encourage certain behaviours. Change the formal incentives and if people know about the changes, you will see some changes in individuals’ behaviours.
  • Learning and training – when opportunities are taken up to develop new skills that relate to the job in hand, behaviour usually changes.
  • Informal incentives – there are a lot of tacit rewards and social benefits to certain behaviours, and these can really block creative or risky behaviours. Changing informal incentives is really about looking at culture. When it comes to innovation culture, most approaches are top-down. But there is scope to work peer-to-peer to spark more creative choices and new kinds of conversations.

Question: 

How to you get buy-in for innovation at all levels?

Our reply:

If you mean “buy in” for innovation work, one way to start is to frame an innovation project in terms of a challenge the business has already recognised. This reassures sceptics and conservative people that time spent addressing the challenge is “worth” it.

If you mean “buy in” around a specific idea – for something novel, that the business has never tried before – we really encourage people to convey the new idea as a story. Show the listeners how the novel idea will/could really make a difference to people who matter to your business to win their support.

Question: 

How to leverage the creativity and excitement of people at lower levels of the organisation?

Our reply:

You need a process to collect their ideas and then you need to show follow-through: what happened to the ideas and when some ideas are implemented, how well to do they work? When people know that suggestions may drive changes that make a real difference, they’ll stay more engaged.

Question: How to get more people involved without overloading the innovation pipeline

 Our reply: 

Ultimately, the pipeline needs resources to handle ideas – which means processing them appropriately and astutely. Winning those resources is a journey.